history links

Italy
Si scrive “madamato”, ma si legge “stupro legalizzato”. Un termine usato nelle ex-colonie italiane, prima in Eritrea e successivamente anche nelle altre colonie, Libia e Somalia.
Il termine madamato designava, inizialmente in Eritrea e successivamente nelle altre colonie italiane, una relazione temporanea more uxorio tra un cittadino italiano (soldati prevalentemente, ma non solo) ed una donna nativa delle terre colonizzate, chiamata in questo caso madama.
Dopo un raccolto ne viene un altro
Propaganda Due (Italian pronunciation: [propaˈɡanda ˈduːe]; P2) was a Masonic lodge under the Grand Orient of Italy, founded in 1877. Its Masonic charter was withdrawn in 1976, and it transformed into a clandestine, pseudo-Masonic, ultraright[1][2][3] organization operating in contravention of Article 18 of the Constitution of Italy that banned secret associations. In its latter period, during which the lodge was headed by Licio Gelli, P2 was implicated in numerous Italian crimes and mysteries, including the collapse of the Vatican-affiliated Banco Ambrosiano, the murders of journalist Mino Pecorelli and banker Roberto Calvi, and corruption cases within the nationwide bribe scandal Tangentopoli. P2 came to light through the investigations into the collapse of Michele Sindona's financial empire.[4]
Operation Gladio is the codename for clandestine "stay-behind" operations of armed resistance that was planned by the Western Union (WU), and subsequently by NATO, for a potential Warsaw Pact invasion and conquest in Europe. Although Gladio specifically refers to the Italian branch of the NATO stay-behind organizations, "Operation Gladio" is used as an informal name for all of them. Stay-behind operations were prepared in many NATO member countries, and some neutral countries.[1]
Il 3 febbraio di 14 anni fa un aereo militare Usa spezzò il cavo di una funivia uccidendo 20 persone. Ora uno dei marine che erano ai comandi ammette che quel volo era una sorta di gita per divertirsi. E che subito prima dell’incidente stava facendo riprese panoramiche con la sua videocamera. In un nastro …
Hanno fatto la storia del Novecento, non solo editoriale, anche culturale ed esistenziale. Desintati all'oblio per volontà suicida del regime distributivo, noi gli restituiamo una nuova e ugualmente straordinaria vita, e per sempre
Questo opuscolo non porta sfiga, leggerlo non provoca effetti collaterali. Si presenta così Come ti frego il virus, tascabile non solo di nome ma anche di fatto: quando fu pubblicato i ragazzi se lo mettevano in tasca, soprattutto dopo che ne fu “proibita” l’introduzione nelle scuole. L’opuscolo - firmato nel 1991 dalla Commissione nazionale per la lotta contro l'Aids, dall’allora ministro della Sanità e naturalmente da Silver - provocò le ire dell’allora ministro dell’Istruzione.
People
Amelio Robles Ávila (3 November 1889 – 9 December 1984) was a colonel during the Mexican Revolution. Assigned female at birth with the name Amelia Robles Ávila, Robles fought in the Mexican Revolution, rose to the rank of colonel, and lived openly as a man from age 24 until his death at age 95.
Alan L. Hart (October 4, 1890 – July 1, 1962) was an American physician, radiologist, tuberculosis researcher, writer and novelist. He was in 1917–18 one of the first trans men to undergo hysterectomy in the United States, and lived the rest of his life as a man. He pioneered the use of x-ray photography in tuberculosis detection, and helped implement TB screening programs that saved thousands of lives.[1]
Many people have engaged in cross-dressing during wartime under various circumstances and for various motives. This has been especially true of women, whether while serving as a soldier in otherwise all-male armies, while protecting themselves or disguising their identity in dangerous circumstances, or for other purposes.
Lynn Ann Conway (born January 2, 1938)[2][3] is an American computer scientist, electrical engineer, inventor, and transgender activist.[4]
Politics
Dopo un raccolto ne viene un altro
Propaganda Due (Italian pronunciation: [propaˈɡanda ˈduːe]; P2) was a Masonic lodge under the Grand Orient of Italy, founded in 1877. Its Masonic charter was withdrawn in 1976, and it transformed into a clandestine, pseudo-Masonic, ultraright[1][2][3] organization operating in contravention of Article 18 of the Constitution of Italy that banned secret associations. In its latter period, during which the lodge was headed by Licio Gelli, P2 was implicated in numerous Italian crimes and mysteries, including the collapse of the Vatican-affiliated Banco Ambrosiano, the murders of journalist Mino Pecorelli and banker Roberto Calvi, and corruption cases within the nationwide bribe scandal Tangentopoli. P2 came to light through the investigations into the collapse of Michele Sindona's financial empire.[4]
Operation Gladio is the codename for clandestine "stay-behind" operations of armed resistance that was planned by the Western Union (WU), and subsequently by NATO, for a potential Warsaw Pact invasion and conquest in Europe. Although Gladio specifically refers to the Italian branch of the NATO stay-behind organizations, "Operation Gladio" is used as an informal name for all of them. Stay-behind operations were prepared in many NATO member countries, and some neutral countries.[1]
Il 3 febbraio di 14 anni fa un aereo militare Usa spezzò il cavo di una funivia uccidendo 20 persone. Ora uno dei marine che erano ai comandi ammette che quel volo era una sorta di gita per divertirsi. E che subito prima dell’incidente stava facendo riprese panoramiche con la sua videocamera. In un nastro …
History
«Operation Tamarisk was a Cold War-era operation run by the military intelligence services of the U.S., U.K., and France through their military liaison missions in East Germany, that gathered discarded paper, letters, and garbage from Soviet trash bins and military maneuvers, including used toilet paper.»
«The Mortara case (Italian: caso Mortara) was an Italian cause célèbre that captured the attention of much of Europe and North America in the 1850s and 1860s. It concerned the Papal States' seizure of a six-year-old boy named Edgardo Mortara from his Jewish family in Bologna, on the basis of a former servant's testimony that she had administered an emergency baptism to the boy when he fell ill as an infant.»
«Is progress inevitable? Is it natural? Is it fragile? Is it possible? Is it a problematic concept in the first place? Many people are reexamining these kinds of questions as 2016 draws to a close, so I thought this would be a good moment to share the sort-of “zoomed out” discussions the subject that historians like myself are always having.»
Software for MS-DOS machines that represent entertainment and games. The collection includes action, strategy, adventure and other unique genres of game and entertainment software. Through the use of the EM-DOSBOX in-browser emulator, these programs are bootable and playable
Breeching was the occasion when a small boy was first dressed in breeches or trousers. From the mid-16th century[1] until the late 19th or early 20th century, young boys in the Western world were unbreeched and wore gowns or dresses until an age that varied between two and eight.[2] Various forms of relatively subtle differences usually enabled others to tell little boys from little girls, in codes that modern art historians are able to understand.
Sull’opportunità di rimarcare o meno le differenze di genere negli anni della prima infanzia è stato scritto tutto e il contrario di tutto. Indipendentemente da ciò che ognuno di noi può pensare, ancora una volta pare proprio che la storia smentisca solide convinzioni.
«Writing about the first winter the men spent on the ice, Cherry-Garrard casually mentions an astonishing lecture on scurvy by one of the expedition’s doctors…»
Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male[a] was a clinical study conducted between 1932 and 1972 by the U.S. Public Health Service.[1][2] The purpose of this study was to observe the natural history of untreated syphilis; the African-American men in the study were only told they were receiving free health care from the United States government.[3]
Westfjords district commissioner invites Basques to ceremony to revoke 1615 law that sparked massacre known as Slaying of the Spaniards
On 27 June 1980, Itavia Flight 870 (IH 870, AJ 421), a McDonnell Douglas DC-9 passenger jet en route from Bologna to Palermo, Italy, crashed into the Tyrrhenian Sea between the islands of Ponza and Ustica, killing all 81 people on board. Known in Italy as the Ustica massacre ("strage di Ustica"), the disaster led to numerous investigations, legal actions and accusations, and continues to be a source of controversy, including claims of conspiracy by the Italian government and others. The Prime Minister of Italy at the time, Francesco Cossiga, attributed the crash to a missile fired from a French Navy aircraft, despite contrary evidence presented in a 1994 report. On 23 January 2013, Italy's top criminal court ruled that there was "abundantly" clear evidence that the flight was brought down by a missile.
The Cavalese cable car disaster of 1998, also called the Strage del Cermis ("Massacre at Cermis") occurred on 3 February 1998, near the Italian town of Cavalese, a ski resort in the Dolomites some 40 km (25 mi) northeast of Trento. Twenty people died when a United States Marine Corps EA-6B Prowler aircraft, while flying too low, against regulations, in order for the pilots to "have fun" and "take videos of the scenery", cut a cable supporting a gondola of an aerial tramway.
Con Strage dell'Istituto Salvemini si fa riferimento a un disastro aereo avvenuto a Casalecchio di Reno il 6 dicembre 1990, in cui un aereo militare Aermacchi MB-326 cadde su un istituto tecnico causando la morte di dodici studenti e il ferimento di altre 88 persone.