Latest posts for tag eng

The Bouletcorp » Love & Dragons is a strip I like about fairytale relationships.

There are a lot of mainstream expectations about relationships. These links challenge a few of them:

More about emotional work, some more links to follow a previous links post:

A few interesting places to visit. Traveling could be complicated, and internet searches could be interesting enough.

For example, churches:

Or fascinating urbanistic projects, for which it's worth to look up photos:

Or nature, like Get Lost in Mega-Tunnels Dug by South American Megafauna

Cognitive bias cheat sheet has another elegant infographic summarising cognitive biases. On this subject, you might want to also check out 15 Insane Things That Correlate With Each Other.

Get started | Learning Music (Beta) has a nice interactive introduction to music making.

If you leave in a block of flats and decide to learn music making, please use headphones when experimenting. Our neighbour, sadly, didn't.

You can also learn photography with Photography for Beginners (The Ultimate Guide in 2020) and somewhat related, Understanding Aspect Ratios: A Comprehensive Guide

A fascinating apparent paradox that kind of makes sense: Czech nudists reprimanded by police for not wearing face-masks.

Besides being careful about masks when naked at the lake, be careful about your laptop being confused for a pizza: German nudist chases wild boar that stole laptop.

Talking about pigs: Pig starts farm fire by excreting pedometer.

Now that traveling is complicated, you might enjoy A Brief History of Children Sent Through the Mail, or learning about Narco-submarines.

Meanwhile, in a time of intense biotechnological research, Scientists rename human genes to stop Microsoft Excel from misreading them as dates.

Finally, for a good, cheaper, and more readily available alternative to a trip to the pharmacy, learn about Hypoalgesic effect of swearing.

Here are the slides of mine and Ulrike's talk Doing things /together/.

Our thoughts about cooperation aspects of doing things together.

Sometimes in Debian we do work together with others, and sometimes we are a number of people who work alone, and happen to all upload their work in the same place.

In times when we have needed to take important decisions together, this distinction has become crucial, and some of us might have found that we were not as good at cooperation as we would have thought.

This talk is intended for everyone who is part of a larger community. We will show concepts and tools that we think could help understand and shape cooperation.

Video of the talk:

The slides have extensive notes: you can use ViewNotes in LibreOffice Impress to see them.

Here are the Inkscape sources for the graphs:

Here are links to resources quoted in the talk:

In the Q&A, pollo asked:

How can we still have a good code review process without making it a "you need to be perfect" scenario? I often find picky code reviews help me write better code.

Ulrike wrote a more detailed answer: Code reviews: from nitpicking to cooperation

Saint Guinefort was a dog who lived in France in the 13th century, worshipped through history as a saint until less than a century ago. The recurrence is soon, on the 22th of August.

Many think middle ages were about superstition, and generally a bad period. Black Death, COVID, and Why We Keep Telling the Myth of a Renaissance Golden Age and Bad Middle Ages tells a different, fascinating story.

Another fascinating middle age story is that of Christine de Pizan, author of The Book of the City of Ladies. This is a very good lecture about her (in Italian): Come pensava una donna nel Medioevo? 2 - Christine de Pizan. You can read some of her books at the Memory of the World library.

If you understand Italian, Alessandro Barbero gives fascinating lectures. You can find them index in a timeline, or in a map.

Still from around the middle ages, we get playing cards: see Playing Cards Around the World and Through the Ages.

If you want to go have a look in person, and you overshoot with your time machine, here's a convenient route planner for antique Roman roads.

View all historical links that I have shared.

“That which we do not bring to consciousness appears in our lives as fate.” — Carl Jung
Emotional support of others can take the form of surface-level consolation. But compassion means being willing to listen and feel, even when it's uncomfortable.
Ultimately, the driving force behind the “power of positive thinking” meme is the word “power.” But what about those whose bodies are not powerful? What about those who are vulnerable? What about those who are tired, isolated, and struggling? What about those who are ill? What about those who lack
I have often been dismissive or unhelpful when someone close to me was dealing with painful circumstances, having learned to “accentuate the positive.” In the more recent past, I have recognized these behavioral patterns as part of what some mental health professionals term, “toxic positivity.”
Toxic positivity is the overgeneralization of a happy, optimistic state resulting in the denial & invalidation of the authentic human emotional experience.

Snap guides

Dragging from the rulers does not always create snap guides. If it doesn't, click on the slide background, "Snap guides", "Insert snap guide". In my case, after the first snap guide was manually inserted, it was possible to drag new one from the rulers.

Master slides

How to edit a master slide

  • Show master slides side pane
  • Right click on master slide
  • Edit Master...
  • An icon appears in the toolbar: "Close Master View"
  • Apply to all slides might not apply to the first slide created as the document was opened

Change styles in master slide

Do not change properties of text by selecting placeholder text in the Master View. Instead, open the Styles and formatting sidebar, and edit the styles in there.

This means the style changes are applied to pages in all layouts, not just the "Title, Content" layout that is the only one editable in the "Master View".

How to duplicate a master slide

There seems to be no feature implemented for this, but you can do it, if you insist:

  • Save a copy of the document
  • Rename the master slide
  • Drag a slide, that uses the renamed master slide, from the copy of the document to the original one

It's needed enough that someone made a wikihow: https://www.wikihow.com/Copy-a-LibreOffice-Impress-Master-Slide.

How to change the master slide for a layout that is not "Title, Content"

I could not find a way to do it, but read on for a workaround.

I found an ask.libreoffice.org question that went unanswered.

I asked on #libreoffice on IRC and got no answer:

Hello. I'm doing the layout for a presentation in impress, and I can edit all sorts of aspects of the master slide. It seems that I can only edit the "Title, Content" layout of the master slide, though. I'd like to edit, for example, the "Title only" layout so that the title appears in a different place than the top of the page. Is it possible to edit specific layouts in a master page?

In the master slide editor it seems impossible to select a layout, for example.

Alternatively I tried creating multiple master slides, but then if I want to create a master slide for a title page, there's no way to remove the outline box, or the title box.

My work around has been to create multiple master slides, one for each layout. For a title layout, I moved the outline box into a corner, and one has to remove it manually after create a new slide.

There seems to be no way of changing the position of elements not found in the "Title, Content" layout, like "Subtitle". On the other hand, given that one's working with an entirely different master slide, one can abuse the outline box as a subtitle.

Note that if you later decide to change a style element for all the slides, you'll need to go propagate the change to the "Styles and Formatting" menu of all master slides you're using.

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragonfly#Sex_ratios:

Sex ratios

The sex ratio of male to female dragonflies varies both temporally and spatially. Adult dragonflies have a high male-biased ratio at breeding habitats. The male-bias ratio has contributed partially to the females using different habitats to avoid male harassment.

As seen in Hine's emerald dragonfly (Somatochlora hineana), male populations use wetland habitats, while females use dry meadows and marginal breeding habitats, only migrating to the wetlands to lay their eggs or to find mating partners.

Unwanted mating is energetically costly for females because it affects the amount of time that they are able to spend foraging.

This is part of a series of posts on compiling a custom version of Qt5 in order to develop for both amd64 and a Raspberry Pi.

After having had some success with a sysroot in having a Qt5 cross-build environment that includes QtWebEngine, the next step is packaging the sysroot so it can be available both to build the cross-build environment, and to do cross-development with it.

The result is this Debian source package which takes a Raspberry Pi OS disk image, provisions it in-place, extracts its contents, and packages them.

Yes. You may want to reread the last paragraph.

It works directly in the disk image to avoid a nasty filesystem issue on emulated 32bit Linux over a 64bit mounted filesystem.

This feels like the most surreal Debian package I've ever created, and this saga looks like one of the hairiest yaks I've ever shaved.

Integrating this monster codebase, full of bundled code and hacks, into a streamlined production and deployment system has been for me a full stack nightmare, and I have a renewed and growing respect for the people in the Qt/KDE team in Debian, who manage to stay on top of this mess, so that it all just works when we need it.